Paw prints in the sand

These are my boys.  Al and Zeke. We’ve been hunting the beach and woods for years. Both have very different in personalities, but they are brothers and they’re a pack.

The very first thing they do when we get to the beach is to sniff out paw prints left by other dogs. They can tell when a dog has been there, if the dog is still around, and more information about the unknown animal through their keen sense of smell. As we start out on our walks, I keep an eye out. Mine are two of the sweetest dogs you’ll ever meet. But they don’t mess around when they come across a new dog. They have a routine and I know it well. People mistakenly believe that since I am an animal communicator, I can talk with them and ask them to behave in a certain way. But once we’re on the beach, they are dogs and I am human. They tune me out and do their dog thing.

When we meet up with a new dog on the beach (whose paw prints my boys have already detected) the dogs will posture. They stand and look stern as do the new dogs. Then Zeke, the smaller one will make contact. Al will follow and they begin the introductions. It’s interesting for me to watch.  If the humans with the new dog (or dogs) are relaxed, tails will wag and all will get along fine. I know my boys and know they’re friendly once they’ve been properly introduced.  Then it’s sniff time with the new canine, to make sure they all know who is the alpha: Al. He’s daunting because he’s so big, but inside that large body is a very sweet shy dog.

But if we come across dogs whose humans are uptight, then all the dogs will immediately break out into a brawl.  This used to scare me and *I* would become uptight. But how am I (one human) going to break up a brawl of 3-4 large dogs? I found the best thing for me was to simply keep walking and ignore the noise. After all, that’s typically what these fights are: a lot of noise  Once my dogs see that their efforts are being ignored, they leave the fray and follow me quickly. No leashes, no fuss, no yelling – we simply walk away.

No matter what the size or shape of your dog, they are all descendants of wolves and they have  to posture and fuss because it’s in their nature.   But when my dogs return to me after a dog meet-up, I always remind them they are good boys.  With those two words, they know I love them – in spite of their sometimes unruly behavior. Because this is what dogs do. They all need introductions and it’s up to us as humans to socialize them. Our reaction is what determines their behavior.

Not all dogs are as lucky as mine. As an animal communicator I have many clients who are uncomfortable with walking their dogs because they are worried about what might happen. “Dogs on ropes” as Zeke calls them, feel at a disadvantage when they come across another dog off lead. Coupled with their human’s fear of the unknown, a docile dog can become aggressive and this will turn into a pattern with a dog of any size. Small dogs are dogs too. As their human when you walk your small dog, let them sniff everything, let them smell the “paw prints in the sand”, and introduce them to a new dog, with no fear. If you are confident, the dog will be confident. Everybody wins.

“Paw prints” are left here on my blog . I want to thank all of you who have followed my experiences, been loyal clients, and left comments on my bog. I can see who you are and when you’ve been here and I really appreciate the return visits. Thank you.

And since it’s Christmas, I want to end this with a beautiful message Al once gave me. He was born “accidentally”  when his mom mated with a Shepherd up the road. His mom was a Husky and was set to be bred with their dog – his dad’s favorite dog of all time: Bob. Sadly, Bob died before Al was born, so Al was the chosen one out of the litter to live with the family. He knew from Day One that his dad could never love him as he had loved Bob. He loved his dad anyway, did as he was asked as he grew, and became a much beloved member of the family. But there was always that distance between Al and his dad. Al wasn’t Bob.

Through my animal communication, I taught Al’s dad a lot about Al and the things he had to say. Al was nothing like Bob but his sweet nature is irresistible. With his giant frame, there is a heart as big to go with it.

One day we were walking the beach and Al was at my side. He said to me “My dad loves me now like he loved Bob.” I replied “Really Al?, That’s great!” and he said “Yes, and all I had to do was be myself.”

May we all be reminded daily of Al’s message: to love others as we leave our “paw prints in the sand” and are loved by others:  simply by being ourselves.

 

**this is a family I am very close to. I am an honorary member of the pack and spend as much time as I can with Al and Zeke AND their other two dogs.

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One thought on “Paw prints in the sand

  1. Pingback: Gifts from 2010 « The Hermit's Journey

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