Don’t Want To Talk Politics, but…

This isn’t going to be a space where I talk about my feelings on politics. At some point we all need to get away from it. But this is really a sad story.

The USDA for years has been keeping a list of reputable dog breeders in the US. They’ve also made notes of people who claim to be breeders and are not. And what’s wrong with that? A lot. The first thing that comes to mind is a dog I worked with many years ago. He was not even a year old and had so many health issues. My client was of Korean descent and I believe the “breeder” took advantage of her English which wasn’t perfect. It became more than obvious as Chewy’s story unfolded that he had been a victim of a non licensed, greedy dog breeder. My best guess his that he over-bred the mother until her puppies began to show signs of illness.

This story about what the Trump administration has done is equally awful. We need to have good access to the list of puppies and their breeders. Not by a written request that can take months, we need that information at the click of a mouse.  Like it was two weeks ago. Please, call your congress men and women and tell them to get this list reinstated.

Thank you, I’ll get off my high horse. It just really makes me mad after what dogs like Chewy went through. And will now continue to go though.

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Chewy’s Story

I have been writing about this little client since I started my blog. I gave him an alias (Han) and his journey with me and his human starts here back in the early summer of ’09.  This is the original photo I was given of the young Yorkshire Terrier puppy. Cute isn’t he?

He was less than a year old in this photo, had swollen eyes due to chemicals in the carpet, and was basically miserable. His humans reported that on a walk, Chewy had to stop and rest every few feet. And he was a puppy.

His vet (who had good intentions) just about killed him trying to determine what was wrong with Chewy. My human client Angela, was desperate to find out what was going on with him and called me. I always tell clients that they MUST use a vet, animal communicators are no substitute for a trained vet. But using an animal communicator can be very helpful.  Talking directly to the animal can bring things to light that vets can’t detect. We can find out how the animal is feeling and where they feel sick, and this aids the vet, if the vet is open to it. Because most animal communicators are not trained professional vets, you MUST use a vet of your choice if you have an animal who is ill.

Chewy had a rough time by seeing his regular vet.  He almost died. But I talked with Angela and she agreed to switch him to a Holistic vet. And it was then that Chewy’s life began to slowly change for the better. He had all kinds of issues with this white blood cell count, was severely anemic, and eventually had to have his spleen removed. His spleen was half of Chewy’s total weight. This surgery had everyone on edge – but it was necessary and it worked to alleviate his many health problems. This was Chewy after his surgery – mind you, this little guy is under 2 years of age. He had to wear a t-shirt in order to stay warm.  

Chewy has  weathered this storm. Through his mom’s love, his wonderful vets, and the love of his other humans, he is NOW a happy and healthy dog. But Chewy is a miracle of sorts. Had Angela stayed with her original vet, I have no doubt he’d be in spirit.

I have noticed through writing my blog that Yorkies are very popular dogs. They have hair vs fur (which makes them a great dog for those with allergies), they are beyond adorable, and if they’re anything like Chewy, they have  wonderful personalities. Even through his toughest times, he continued to be a dog. He loved unconditionally, played the best he could, and lived in the moment.

There are people out there “posing” as breeders. They aren’t licensed, are loosely regulated depending on the state you live in, and are breeding dogs too close together. It’s animal cruelty. So:buyer beware.

Don’t wish to go through all that? Then head to your local shelter and choose a “Heinz 57” dog who will be just as loyal and loving. If you’re unsure of your choice? Simply choose with your heart. It never fails us. And if you’re unsure of the dog’s past, an animal communicator or pet psychic can help you to learn the dog’s history. Most animals are straight forward with their past. They simply want to please and be loved.  Just like my buddy Chewy.

And now, let’s see the happy ending. After all the tests, surgeries, supplements, and love, here is Chewy today. A happy 100% healthy boy!

But what a journey it took to get here!

 

*Update: Sent by Angela, here is Chewy today. (Is it me? Or is this little guy smiling?)

 

 


Another update on Han

The name and photo of the dog I’m writing about have been changed. This cute puppy’s photo was borrowed.,

You all remember little Han don’t you? If you’re a loyal reader, you’ll know him. And most of the searches on my blog are for Yorkie pups. So let’s review – in case you’re new.

Han’s mom called me last spring. I work with photos when I talk to animals and his original photo was one of the saddest I’ve ever seen. This puppy was under a year old, had as swollen face due to allergies and a bad gut. He couldn’t walk more than a few yards without sitting down to rest. I got her away from the “well meaning vet” and with a vet I knew could help him.

My client bought her pup because he has hair instead of fur. Her son is allergic to dog fur, so she did some research and found this breed to be good. She found a “breeder” and got her new puppy.

At the time, Oregon had no laws to speak of to control animal breeding. I don’t think what we have now is sufficient.  I am not going to quote it now because I don’t have the exact numbers but will post it later. Something like you can have up to 50 intact dogs in order to be called a breeder. Anyone can be a breeder and there’s big money in it. Choose a popular adorable breed and then breed the sh*** out of her. Soon after my client bought Han, his brother was returned to the breeder. The breeder then called my client to see if she would like to add to her family. She wisely said no.

OK so, I got off track but this little guy is now 18 months old, been to several vets, and recently had his spleen removed.  The spleen weighed a pound and Han only weighed 4 pounds going into surgery. As the saying goes “you do the math”.

I’m amazed at what we do for our animals. My client works two jobs, literally early morning to late into the night so that she can pay for his vet bills.  He’s with a holistic vet and also a specialist now as he has an issue with his blood. I think it’s his red blood cell count. My client speaks English well, but is not from this country. When she gets excited or upset she tends to talk fast. I try to keep up.

I’m furious that these puppies are being allowed to be bred and sold. The topic of how much she originally paid for Han hasn’t  come up, but I know she never expected to be working this hard for a little sick dog. A dog she has come to love and adore just like one of her own kids. A dog who was sick right out of the gate.

I will continue to post updates on Han. And I will say that he is feeling much better now that his spleen has been removed. That is all the info I have on his current condition though because my client has no time to call or email me with specifics. She’s working.

Update on the Story of “Han”


Do you remember Han? He is the year old puppy who has seen the inside of a vet’s office more often than he’s marked a tree. Why? Because he is sick. He was born with a severe disadvantage. I could speculate, but I don’t know for sure. Maybe the fact he came from a puppy mill had something a lot to do with it.

I don’t know how puppy mills work for sure. I do know that they over-breed the “cute ones” and finally end up with litters of puppies that aren’t healthy. That dang in-breeding. You know, you may have met someone sometime that you suspect could be the product of “in-breeding”. Well imagine you’re really adorable at birth – but have serious defects internally from making sure you’re really cute.

Anyway – little Han here almost died. First he had the journey with the well-meaning but totally inept veterinarian, who just about killed him. The vet was convinced that the puppy had cancer and his last attempt at a biopsy, nicked the Hans’ kidneys – sending him straight the the animal ER. Nice.

I suggested to my client and to ANYONE who is seeing a revolving door with their vet, to seek out the opinion of a holistic vet. I didn’t believe that Han had much time left. Seriously. Vet #1 was on the verge of killing Han with “kindness” and then blaming it on “cancer”.

So Mom of Han visited the holistic vet and as we sit here – some two weeks later – Han is not only doing well, he’s going to most likely lead a normal life. His problems were properly indentified, they had nothing to do with cancer and he looks great. The puppy with the puffy eyes is now clear eyed and well, smiling for lack of a better word.

This family has been through hell with the poor puppy. And why? Because somewhere out there in our state where it’s still legal, a “breeder” over-bred their dogs out of greed. Greed for the breed.

Make sure what you’re getting. Because you might not get the healthiest “pure-bred” out there , and you might end up caring for a very sick pup.

Or do what Hans’ brother’s humans did – return him. Wonder where he is now?

AGAIN, THIS ISN’T MY CLIENT OR HIS PHOTO.  MY REAL PHOTOS KEEP BEING STOLEN.

The cool truth about overly bred dogs

I have had the hardest week. I have a new client who bought a Yorkie (like this one) from a “breeder”. The “breeder” told her that this was a second litter dog between the mom and dad Yorke’s. She just had the two dogs. Yeah. right.

This little client of mine has suffered his entire life. Which is just a year. He has an “undetermined infection” which has caused his tummy great discomfort. He has had more tests done (that have shown nothing) than most dogs have in a lifetime. He has two human boys who love him and are scared to death he’s going to die.

Cool huh? They got a Yorkie!

The reason they chose going with a “breeder” and not a shelter dog is that one of the boys is allergic to pet dander. Yorkie’s don’t have this issue since they have hair and not fur. So the excited children brought home their puppy and their question to me was “Does he like us? He never wants to play.”

Wow. A dog, no a puppy that doesn’t want to play! Imagine. Well this little guy told me that he loves his human brothers but that his tummy hurts him. All the time. So he acts like an old dog. He lies around most of the day and feels like crap.

The “breeder” called my client 6 months later to see if she wanted another puppy. My client (who is not originally from this country but is by no means stupid) said she understood it was too soon for there to be more puppies. And the “breeder” said there had been an accident.

Yeah right.

My client here “Han” as he is called, is living a life of misery. And his “breeders” brought more puppies into the world much sooner than they were supposed to. They thought that Han”s mom would jump at the chance to have another puppy.

Yeah right.

The truth is that every day thousands of dogs are put to death in shelters around this country. Thousands of innocent sweet faces gone. Many potential best friends sent to spirit. The dog doesn’t really care. They’ll come back in a more attractive “package” so that some human will fall in love and learn the lessons that this dog has to offer.

And Han here? Well he’s been introduced to a holistic vet. And just in the nick of time. I think his life will improve and he’ll become the puppy his human kids wanted in the first place. But if his mom wasn’t determined, smart, an even fighting a language issue – Hans here would be gone too. She is very brave and very strong. The mom of my client.

So if you MUST adopt a bred dog. Be real sure what you’re getting. And if you have a choice, check out your local shelter first. There will be someone there to fall in love with. Remember to spay and neuter your own animals. That’s a start.